A Message from Ruth at Antiques And Teacups

Welcome to the blog of Antiques And Teacups! Let's share a cup of tea and talk about the things we love...like teacups, antiques, collectibles, visiting England, antiquing and learning about victoriana and quirky gadgets. Fun!

Monday, October 19, 2020

Enjoying Fall With Transferware, Victoria Magazines And A Culinary Flop!

 


Hello! It's half way through October already, which is so hard to believe!

It has been a strange normally not normal month so far... you know what I mean...

including a troll attack on Facebook, medication adjustments for my Honey, and generally just reminding ourselves it's day by day....


We have been having... finally... some seasonable rain and cloudy, foggy weather, so photographing has not been best.


But it has been a comfort to have a cup of tea and relax at times with the joy of perusing past Victoria magazines...


A new addition here are some transferware cups and saucers in 
 of my favorite pattern of Tonquin from the 1960s from Royal Staffordshire, England that was designed when the famous Clarice Cliff was art director. Quite traditional and different from her better known modernistic Bizarre lines, but just gorgeous ironstone transferware.


The pattern was made in several colorways like red, blue, green and brown.


The pottery was included in the Shorter group and A. J. Wilkinson as well as the Newport Pottery and was acquired by Wedgwood in 1965 when the pottery basically disappeared.


And of course, a teapot! Another new-to-us item is this 1950s Johnson Brothers Wakefield ironstone teapot under their Windsor Ware line.

The hand colored on brown transferware design features different cottage garden flowers.. so pretty!


Johnson Brothers is another pottery begun in the late Victorian era in the Stoke-on-Trent area in 1883. The pottery survived both World Wars but, like many area potteries, had difficulties in the 1960s and were acquired by Wedgwood in 1968. In 2003, all production was moved out of the UK... sigh... and the brand, along with many in the WWRD or Waterford Wedgwood Royal Doulton comglomerate were acquired by Fiskars in 2015.


This cutie is a hot water pot, but mostly used as a teapot, in the Ye Olde Inne design made by Royal Winton Grimwades, England in their hand painted Rubian Ware cottage ware line from the 1930s.


The pottery, most famous for their wonderful chintzware, has survived since 1900 through several family changes and fluctuating fortunes, but is till in operation in the UK, although this line has not been made since the 1950s, and is very collectible.


And then there is.... my flop!

I was intrigued by a recipe for pumpkin scones using self rising flour and English lemonade... 7Up... so tried it... and it flopped! So not even giving you the recipe. A disappointment. Did not like the texture... which was softer than an English scone and more like a European scone. Anyway, not my best experiment!

I found this wonderful October's Party poem by George Cooper in a book a few years ago and want to share it with you as I did enjoy it, and remember reading it as a grade school student. I hope it mirrors your own experience and brings a smile and a sense of peace to you!



 



Monday, September 28, 2020

October Arrives, and September Departs With Tea, Of Course!

 


October quote from Tea Time magazine

from Anne Of Green Gables

As usual, my old Victoria, Tea Time and Country Home magazines and Country Diary Of An Edwardian Lady has been a companion at teatime respites...

as the last weeks have been difficult with the smoke, and adjustments in medication for my husband's degenerating Parkinson's Disease. A moving target, at best.

We also had to say farewell... from a masked safe distance, to our daughter and son in law, who were returning to Utah for the winter, to return in early March. They have done extensive work this summer on the property they bought last year in preparation of building a house. Roads are in, septic system installed and electrical hook ups are complete, as well as fencing and gates.

Next year it's well and build.



We had a fall themed tea in the sunroom...




It's an autumn themed tea time today....


I am using my family 1950s Arzberg, Germany unnamed pattern china that my parents brought home from a convention/international meeting in Munich...




I do love the fruit and nuts....recently I found some pieces of the same pattern which I don't need, so will be adding the to my shop Antiques And Teacups as soon as I can...








Joining me on the tea tray is a cut little pewter squirrel candle holder my daughter gave me one year...I just love him...a good companion...



Was not able to bake, so got some nice autumn cookies delivered with our QFC grocery order...





We drink green tea every day, and recently decided to try 2 new Harney & Sons flavors...today's was Blueberry Green tea sachets...
but I found it a bit strong on the blueberry and will be going back to our usual loose Tropical Green from Harney.



It was quite strong smelling...the mail box smelled like the tea even inside a tin in a box! Actually, I thought it smelled like an artificial grape smell, which I don't like, but despite the smell, it does taste like blueberries and vanilla and is quite nice...


and brews a delicate pale straw color as you can see in this photo...So grab a cookie and a cup, and it's so nice to have you for tea! We have remembered to rejoice in our blessings and live one day at a time, trusting in the grace of God! Can't get any better than that!


We are hoping for a more peaceful October, more normal... that is, if there is a normal these days!
Lol!

I did a collage of orange themed items from Antiques And Teacups to start October with.
Wishing you a lovely, colorful autumn week!



Monday, September 14, 2020

September Progresses With Smokey Skies



Autumn blessings to you...and welcome!


The last few days have been difficult, with temperatures in the 80s... which is hot for us here in the Pacific Northwest... with the addition of lots of wildfire smoke from Washington and Oregon which will not clear out without a wind change and some rain. 
But...


I am sharing an autumn tea time in the sunroom,
mixing last elements of summer and autumn things as the season definitely has changed here...we are in the 40s in the morning...


I needed something with a bit of color for a back ground, so added a polychrome transferware charger I have...


The pattern is called Rural England. I love the mill and stream and the flower border...


The plate was made in the 1930s by Midwinter. Midwinter was acquired by Wedgwood in the early 1960s, and did some great mid century modern designs in their Stylecraft line...very groovy, and very different from this earlier design. If you have visited the blog often, you know Wedgwood has gone through several shuffles and is now owned by the Danish firm Fiskars...always interesting keeping up with the potteries...



This teacup is where my end of summer comes in...the Hydrangea patterned Summer Glory Chintz by Shelley...you knew I get a Shelley in here somewhere...



This Summer Glory teacup is from the 1950s, and is the ivory colorway...which I have never thought a good name for the color, but...
the interior is pale yellow. I would call it a pale peach or apricot, but that's just my opinion. The pattern number is 13648, and it is in the Ripon shape. 


And we need at teapot, so here is a 1950s Sadler pale yellow and gold large teapot....


This one has rather fancy gold flowers with heavy gold outlining. Cool! Lots of tea for everyone!


And for the tea...Republic of Tea's Cuppa Cake Tea Caramel Vanilla...a flavored black tea that is a lovely dessert tea...


I have other teacups for you...this is a teacup trio with an autumn leaves design called Windswept...



The bone china pattern is 1950s as well, with pink and grey green swirling leaves. The set is by Tuscan made by Plant. Later marks from the late 1960s-1970s use the name Plant Tuscan. The company has had it's share of changes, as all English potteries have. It was amalgamated into Wedgwood in 1972, and then permanently closed in 2006. I think Fiscars has all the patterns, etc, but whether the name will ever be resurrected is doubtful.


For a trea for tea, I have some Maple leaf shaped chocolate cream biscuits. During the couple of weeks prior to becoming ill with the smoke, we had friends send us these biscuits from Richmond, BC...a favorite... knowing we coud not get together cross border in Victori, BC as we have in past years. 
So sweet!


They are delicious! 


Also in Victoria, BC a few years ago I found this little cookbook by a Victoria author called Sarah's Tea Time by Sarah Amos.  Sarah is a Brit now living in Victoria. Besides lots of recipes it includes her lovely tea time drawings. Charming!


I am hoping the smoke will soon disperse... we are at unhealthy air... 93 out of 100 and are really hibernating with air purifiers on in the living room and bedroom, and medications on a strict schedule and basically hibernating.
My heart breaks for friends in California and Oregon who have been forced to evacuate. 
Please stay healthy and stay safe!



Monday, August 31, 2020

Ending August With Blue Willow



To close out August, I am sharing a perennial favorite today...various versions of the Willow pattern. Willow has always been popular and therefore was frequently made by various potters. Because of it's long life as a pattern and relative abundance of pieces, it is often overlooked as an important part of pottery design.
It's origins go back to 1792 and Josiah Wedgwood.  


Blue Willow comes from a Chinese legend of 2 lovers, forbidden to marry who elope and are chased by the emperor. At the end, the boy is killed defending his fiance and the girl commits suicide. Sigh...not too cheerful.  
The elements that usually turn up are: of course, the Willow tree, the bridge the lovers crossed to elude pursuers...often with the lovers or with 3 people being variously the lovers and a helper or the lovers and the emperor...

a house they took refuge in and, of course,  always includes 2 birds, doves flying together representing the 2 lovers which has become a symbol of undying love.


It is fun to compare the elements of the design, and the various names as well.


Willow or Blue Willow has been in constant production by at least one poyyrty al though the years since it's inception, and has been made by hundresd over the years...
This teapot is a current version of the design by Johnson Brothers from 2004... but the same cherished elements...




This is a Royal Grafton, England version from the 1940s in bone china.




There are even versions in red, yellow and green, although the blue is the most popular....


This is a red, unmarked early 1920s version in red...


Wedgwood made this Yellow Willow pattern in the 1920s as well...


And Masons, England made this Green Willow version in the 1920-1930s...


And this, a very thin porcelain version from Occupied Japan which dates it from 1945-1954.




And a 1930s version by Royal Albert Crown, England , the early Royal Albert mark, in their version called Mikado, but all the usual Willow elements including the 2 birds. Having it in a pink variation is nice too!




There are just so many other versions and colors you would not believe!



A 1960s version from the North Staffordshire Pottery, that had just been acquired by Ridgway, England in their Willow version...


And another English version from a short lived pottery, Royal Venton, that only operated between 1923-1936.


To go along with all the English Willow, I have out my tin of Harney and Sons Royal English Breakfast which is a nice medium strong black tea I always have on hand...



And I baked a dried cherry chocolate chip cake this week... sort of an amalgamation of 3 different recipe I had around, and it turned out really nicely. We always enjoy a bit of cake at teatime!

So...long live Willow, and may there be many more versions to come to extend a wonderful history!



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